New book: The Hidden Beauty of Everyday Life

hiddenbeautylrg.jpgMy most recent book, The Hidden Beauty of Everyday Life, has had a quiet birth. It came closely on the heels of Chief Joseph and has been somewhat lost in the thunder of such a large and tumultuous undertaking. With this blog entry, I’m hoping to begin the process of moving this quiet new creation from the status of newborn to literary toddler.

Hidden Beauty is, indeed, the third in the trilogy that began with Simple Truths and progressed through Small Graces. Hidden Beauty picks up where Small Graces left off and moves us into mystery and beauty of the wider world. Small Graces was a close examination of an ordinary day; Hidden Beauty looks with the same eye at the larger world in which we live.

What I’d like you to do if you are one of those who likes my homiletic books is to consider this review by the wonderful servants of the spirit, Frederic and Mary Ann Brusat, who can always be trusted to find the spiritual implications in any book, film, or event that they discuss. They serve the web community in a way that few others do.

I am most honored whenever they look at any of my works, and I am especially honored when they see merit in what I write. Read their review, and if what they say piques your interest, seek out this quiet little book and consider it for yourself. I hope you find that it is a worthy companion to Simple Truths and Small Graces.

2 comments

  1. Alex says:

    I second that review for anyone who hasn’t yet read it. I wish it wasn’t the case, but with so much competing for our attention, for the hours in our day, it is all too easy to disregard or completely take for granted moments throughout our day that appear “insignificant.” I thought of your book recently when I was in line at the grocery and there was this man behind me who clearly was homeless, and not in full possession of all his mental faculties, and didn’t exactly smell like a bed of roses. He was muttering something, and in my head I was wanting to rush through, for the cashier to speed up and get some distance from this man behind me, not interested in what he was actually saying. As I was walking away with my groceries, the man shouted, “Miss! Turn around.” Admittedly, I was a bit startled, a tad frightened by the command. He looked me straight in the eye, and said in the most direct, sanest of sane voices, “You need to let go. A LOT.” Even if this man had said nothing to me, his value is his value, but this man wasn’t insane, just down on his luck, and in that moment, I felt like a tremendous shamed fool. Once again, I was reminded that my assumptions are baseless, and our teachers are everywhere, and this proud man wasn’t going to allow me to just walk away without calling me on my own crap. He must have been trying to communicate with me in line, and I’d ignored him, written him off. I’m simply amazed at the layers of judgment that are never fully peeled off. These souls of ours need constant pruning it seems!

  2. Christine M. Baker says:

    Mr. Nerburn touched me with NEITHER WOLF NOR DOG and again with THE WISDOM OF NATIVE AMERICANS. When I was seeking a book about Chief Jospeh my decision was made when I saw that Mr. Nerburn had authored a book about the man.

    His book on Chief Jospeh has stirred my soul. Someone had checked his website due to a post I had made on a “native” spiritual website and refered me to this book.

    Not only will I buy and drink in every word of this book but I will do the same with the previous books in this series. I think it will help calm my soul again.

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