A little help from my friends

This is a bit of a whim on my part, but it makes sense. I’ve been thinking about the project that I will undertake after I finish the Joseph book. And it occurs to me that I might want to ask you, my readers, what you would like me to write about. If you have any suggestions, let me know. I can’t promise anything, obviously, but it will help guide my thinking. Send me any thoughts under the “comments” section of this entry. That way other readers will get to see them, too.

Thanks.

10 comments

  1. jim says:

    how about the Cheyenne oddysey?So overlooked,and one of the most courageous events of human spirit undertaken in history.They just wanted to go home….

  2. chuck says:

    There has recently been a lot in the Minneapolis paper about the drug and alcohol problem on the Minnesota reservations. Unfortunately, I think all we got was one point of view, intended to sell papers. How about something on how this problem affects the Native Americans as a whole and what is being/can be done about it. Maybe written from the Indian point of view as with Neither Wolf Nor Dog.

  3. Larry says:

    Just love all your books. As someone whose wife died almost 5 years ago and who is still having some problems coping with the loss, I would be interested in a book dealing with your views concerning the effect of death on a family.

  4. Sharyn says:

    While most of your writing is very spiritual, I would like to see you write a book of a religious nature–specifically about your faith, practice and experiences. I know there are a lot of books about this subject on the market, but given your insight and way with words, (I truly think you are one of God’s messenger’s)yours would be very different and help a lot of us who struggle with our faith as we try to get through each day in this very unkind world. I know you would be setting yourself up for some very unjust criticism but I hope that you will give it some thought.

  5. Erin says:

    Since I know that your heart goes out to children, how about a book on Native American children. I’m not sure which direction you could take with it but I’m sure it would be fun and uplifting.

  6. Ken says:

    Hello Mr. Nerburn, I am reading your book on St. Francis and loving it. Reading it is inspiring to me as a writer! I personally
    feel the best ministry happens when we tell our stories, and you do this so well.

    I have never published a book, but have ideas, outlines and some content for a book that I feel it is my calling to finish
    and seek publication. I feel an editor would be very important even at the outset. I would like to pitch my idea and outline to help trim away tangential stories before I write them, etc, since my time is limited.

    The story is autobiographical, of my becoming a father at 19, difficulties in relationships, my alcohol and drug abuse, accepting God into my heart, my recovery, my relationship with my son and how we have healed/are healing, most importantly
    how long distance fathers can best work with single mothers to co-parent and be most useful to her and the child.

    I would love to know a bit of how you made the leap into publication, how you began working with editors, and what
    suggestions you might have for a writer in my situation, how to pitch a book to editors or publishers.

    Thanks and please keep writing!

    Ken

  7. fabiana badie says:

    Dear Mr. Nerburn:

    All of your books have been beautifully written and each one different. For the past five years I have given your books as gifts to teacher and to all of my friends. Your writing style is poetic and your thoughts deelpy profound. My wish is that you write a book with a spiritual theme because there is such a thirst in the world for spiritual healing and understanding.

    Fabiana

  8. Leigh Austin says:

    Hi Kent –
    blessings to you for your kind and gentle spirit. I am so grateful that you have chosen to share your gifts with the world. I know that whenever I feel low, angry and “in my stuff”, so to speak, I can pick up any one of your stories and remember my place in a grander, larger universe. Even though most of your work has autobiographical tones in it from your wonderful storytelling, I would be fascinated to hear your story- the many paths and roads you have taken to reach where you are today. I would love to hear about your choices, wrong and right, that led you to new awarenesses and understandings. I would be interested to hear your thoughts and emotions from blasting anger to forgiveness of yourself. How did you come to reach this state of peace? If one has read all of your books, one might be able to piece together the patchwork of stories into a picture, but it would never do you justice.
    Blessings and peace,
    Leigh Austin

  9. Kevin says:

    Kent:

    After reading all of your books, I am convinced that you would be the perfect person to address the shameful and discouraging facts surrounding the environmental mess this country has become. Polluted rivers and streams, ungodly air to breathe, the demise of the West as we know it, and urban sprawl have all contributed to a nation’s nightmare. We must all address this problem if we are to survive as a nation. Thanks

    Kevin

  10. Vicki Peterson says:

    As a non-Indian, working for the third largest Tribal College in the United States, I am amazed at how little non-Natives know about the history of colonialism of the Western hemisphere. Given that, which can be explained by the lack of comprehensive historical curriculum in our public schools, it further amazes me how little the public knows about the atrocities that continue to this day. For specifics, look at the continuous cuts to the IHS budget, the struggle of Tribal Colleges to keep their doors open, (and this without football teams) and best of all, Cobell vs. The Dept. of Interior. I doubt that a book about these subjects would be very marketable, at a time when Indians are viewed as some form of exotic curiosity, if they are noticed at all. Nevertheless, it would be interested to see efforts along these lines by someone other than Vine Deloira, Jr. and Wendy Duran. Regardless, I continue to enjoy your work.
    Vicki Peterson
    Salish Kootenai College

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